Studios

Eight unique Studios at TEI’18 will provide new and enriching perspectives on the field of tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction by combining the hands-on with the academic.

  • All Studios are one-day and will take place on Sunday, March 18, 2018.
  • All Studios have a limited number of available registrations, which are served on a first-come-first-serve basis.
  • Studio fees vary between EUR 50 and EUR 95 (incl. 25% VAT), and include lunch and coffee during the day. The different prices reflect the different costs for materials for each studio.
  • Studios are open to all TEI 2018 participants (i.e., they also require registration to the full conference)
  • You can register for Studios at the same time you register for the conference. During the registration process you will be asked to provide a short bio as well as a short statement about your specific interest and previous experience in relation to the studio in order to support the organiser’s planning.

If you have any questions about the program, please email studio_chairs@tei.acm.org.

Overview

S1: Sociomateriality: Infrastructuring and Appropriation of Artifacts
Organized by Tom Jenkins, Vasiliki Tsaknaki, Karey Helms, Ludvig Elblaus, Nicolai B. Hansen
EUR 50,–

S2: Designing eTextiles for the Body: Shape, Volume & Motion
Organized by Rachel Freire, Paul Strohmeier, Cedric Honnet, Jarrod Knibbe, Sophia Brueckner
EUR 95,–

S3: Deformable Controllers: Fabrication and Design to Promote Novel Hand Gestural Interaction Mechanisms
Organized by Victor Cheung, Alexander K. Eady, Audrey Girouard
EUR 95,–

S4: Kinetic Body Extensions for Social Interactions
Organized by Kate Hartman, Boris Kourtoukov, Erin Lewis
EUR 95,–

S5: Internet of Tangibles: Exploring the Interaction-Attention Continuum
Organized by Leonardo Angelini, Elena Mugellini, Omar Abou Khaled, Nadine Couture, Elise van den Hoven, Saskia Bakker
EUR 70,–

S6: Tracking Well-Being – Design Explorations Through Object Theatre
Organized by Andreas Heiberg Skouby, Merja Ryöppy, Robb Mitchell
EUR 50,–

S7: Embodied Interaction with the Raspberry Pi using the HappyBrackets Platform
Organized by Sam Ferguson, Oliver Bown
EUR 50,–

S8: Soma-based design for the skeptics
Organized by Ambra Trotto, Caroline Hummels, Thecla Schiphorst
EUR 95,–


Descriptions

S1: Sociomateriality: Infrastructuring and Appropriation of Artifacts
Organized by Tom Jenkins, Vasiliki Tsaknaki, Karey Helms, Ludvig Elblaus, Nicolai B. Hansen
EUR 50,–

At TEI, novel materials and innovative applications can sometimes outweigh a reflective perspective on the roles that objects and materials can play in social life. In this Studio, we want to bring together researchers and practitioners who are interested in materially exploring design outcomes, and explore those from a sociomaterial perspective. By having participants’ objects and prototypes at the center of the Studio activities, we intend to create prompted speculative fictions as catalysts to link the material outcomes of design practice, to social agency and cultural effects. This Studio will offer an opportunity to examine how objects might participate in social spheres as well as act as material bridges to their design process, by combining a novel approach to the demonstrations, hands-on examination of design objects, and inquiry, into the infrastructuring and appropriation of these artifacts. The themes that will be examined are agency, material participation, and cultural performance of things.


S2: Designing eTextiles for the Body: Shape, Volume & Motion
Organized by Rachel Freire, Paul Strohmeier, Cedric Honnet, Jarrod Knibbe, Sophia Brueckner
EUR 95,–

Our clothing is not flat, but rather conforms and adapts to our bodies. In this hands-on workshop, participants will experiment and create 3D eTextile garments, while discussing the rich history, current state and possible future directions of wearables.
Through garment construction and rapid prototyping, we will explore how to integrate eTextiles into volumetric, tailored garments that better conform to the shape of the human body, and better respond to its movements. We will show examples of connectors and sensors, and discuss the affordances and limitations of various textiles.
A short masterclass will introduce a range of techniques for garment design and construction, ensuring the workshop is suitable for all skill levels. We will include a brief history of wearables and eTextiles, and an overview of recent innovations within HCI and fashion. We encourage people to bring existing projects and ideas, as well as their own materials and preferred microcontrollers.


S3: Deformable Controllers: Fabrication and Design to Promote Novel Hand Gestural Interaction Mechanisms
Organized by Victor Cheung, Alexander K. Eady, Audrey Girouard
EUR 95,–

Build a unique deformable controller that lets you bend, twist, and even stretch! In this studio you will learn to use deformation sensors as an organic and tangible means of human-computer interaction, and you will gain hands-on experience in using these sensors to build deformable controllers. The goal of this studio is to provide a platform to share resources and transfer knowledge of deformable sensors/materials, to foster creativity in using deformable devices as input controllers that harness the wide range of gestures that deformation enables, and to move beyond recreating touch/click inputs in deformable device interactions.


S4: Kinetic Body Extensions for Social Interactions
Organized by Kate Hartman, Boris Kourtoukov, Erin Lewis
EUR 95,–

Studio website: http://socialbodylab.com/kinetic-body-extensions-for-social-interactions/
How can we create wearable devices to amplify, extend, or subvert our existing body language? This studio focuses on in-person, “real life” social interactions. It invites participants to explore ways of physically extending their own expressivity via wearable electronics and structural textile design using a prototyping method developed by OCAD University’s Social Body Lab. Through the use of sensors, servo motors, and pleated and folded textile forms, participants will learn how to create kinetic wearable body extensions that expand and contract in response to intuitive body movements. We will experiment with kinetic structures that vary in size, form, complexity, and placement on the body and experiment with triggers including pressure, flexion, light, and muscle activity. Ranging from the subtle to the absurd, we will prototype new methods for extending and enhancing our physical social interactions.


S5: Internet of Tangibles: Exploring the Interaction-Attention Continuum
Organized by Leonardo Angelini, Elena Mugellini, Omar Abou Khaled, Nadine Couture, Elise van den Hoven, Saskia Bakker
EUR 70,–

There is an increasing interest in the HCI research community to design richer user interactions with the Internet of Things (IoT). This studio will allow exploring the design of tangible interaction with the IoT, what we call Internet of Tangibles. In particular, we aim at investigating the full interaction-attention continuum, with the purpose of designing IoT tangible interfaces that can switch between peripheral interactions that do not disrupt everyday routines and focused interactions that support user’s reflections. This investigation will be conducted through hands-on activities where participants will prototype tangible IoT objects, starting by a paper prototyping phase, supported by design cards, and followed by an Arduino prototype phase. We encourage the participation to everyone interested in designing interactions for the Internet of Things, from both academy and industry and independently from her background. The studio will be also an opportunity for networking with other researchers working in the field.


S6: Tracking Well-Being – Design Explorations Through Object Theatre
Organized by Andreas Heiberg Skouby, Merja Ryöppy, Robb Mitchell
EUR 50,–

Explore and get acquainted with subjective well-being through Object Theatre For Design. Tracking well-being is an expanding field of research where the challenge is not only the technological readiness to record habits of e.g. sleep, activity and diet, but to go beyond numbers and capture users’ subjective well-being. In this workshop we welcome participants from a range of disciplines to engage hands-on with design and theatre, to capture user perceptions of well-being in tangible form. We introduce Object Theatre For Design to explore different techniques for relating to physical artifacts. Participants will explore how to become a medium for object interactions and express object functionalities by developing a new understanding of the artifact. We will bring tracking devices to capture activity data, and a set of carefully selected everyday objects and building materials to support the exploratory design process.


S7: Embodied Interaction with the Raspberry Pi using the HappyBrackets Platform
Organized by Sam Ferguson, Oliver Bown
EUR 50,–

This workshop will introduce creative coding audio for the Raspberry Pi, using the beads platform for audio programming, and the HappyBrackets platform for inter-device communication and sensor data acquisition. We will demonstrate methods to allow each self-contained battery-powered device to acquire sensor data about its surroundings and the way it is being interacted with, as well as methods for designing systems where groups of these devices wirelessly communicate their state, allowing new interaction possibilities and approaches.


S8: Soma-based design for the skeptics
Organized by Ambra Trotto, Caroline Hummels, Thecla Schiphorst
EUR 95,–

What does the body have to do with it? Have you always wondered why some interaction designers and design researchers are so obsessed with using their body and others’ as inspiration for design? Do you want to understand better? Would you like to challenge them constructively and bring in a different perspective? We need the help of all those, in the TEI community are somehow intrigued by movement, choreography, the engagement of body and the sensual layer in the design of interactions and their aesthetics. The more skeptic you are, the more your contribution is valuable, since it will help all of us participating, in sharpening our mutual positions and refining a vocabulary to better communicate both strengths and weaknesses of the so-called soma-based design and design research.